I dont know how she does it book

Date published 
 
    Contents
  1. I Don’t Know How She Does It
  2. I Don’t Know How She Does It Reader’s Guide
  3. Kate Reddy is back and she's 50! Allison Pearson's sequel to I Don't Know How She Does It
  4. Allison Pearson's 'I Don't Know How She Does It' gets a sequel

I Don't Know How She Does It book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Delightfully smart and heartbreakingly poignant, Al. I Don't Know How She Does It [Allison Pearson] on soundbefabnavi.cf *FREE* shipping on Author interviews, book reviews, editors' picks, and more. Read it now. Editorial Reviews. soundbefabnavi.cf Review. Allison Pearson's debut novel, I Don't Know How She Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month ? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a.

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I Dont Know How She Does It Book

In telling the truth about working women in I Don't Know How She Does It, Allison This is a book that could only come from a privileged place. Praise. “Fast funny heartbreaking You root for Kate the whole length of her roller coaster ride.” —The New York Times Book Review “The national. By Allison Pearson. I Don't Know How She Does It by Allison Pearson Sign me up to get more news about Women's Fiction books. Please make a selection.

Reading Guide Book Summary In a novel that is at once uproariously funny and achingly sad, Allison Pearson captures the guilty secret lives of working women--the self-recrimination, the comic deceptions, the giddy exhaustion, the despair--as no other writer has. For every woman trying to strike that impossible balance between work and home--and pretending that she has--and for every woman who has wanted to hurl the acquaintance who coos admiringly, "Honestly, I just don't know how you do it," out a window, here's a novel to make you cringe with recognition and laugh out loud. With fierce, unsentimental irony, Allison Pearson's novel brilliantly dramatizes the dilemma of working motherhood at the start of the twenty-first century. Meet Kate Reddy, hedge-fund manager and mother of two. She can juggle nine different currencies in five different time zones and get herself and two children washed and dressed and out of the house in half an hour.

There may be some truth to this: I know two female executives working for the same firm who lied to attend their children's sports day. Later, on opposite sides of the playing fields, they spotted each other.

Pearson determines to tell the truth about sports days, nativity plays and all the other, more insidious, working-mother-lies. She removes the gag from our mouths with a tremendous flourish. In particular she studies the way we dissemble, deny and hide our more complicated maternal feelings from bosses, husbands, nannies, children and ourselves.

She shows that 'having it all' is sometimes distinct from being able to enjoy any of it. What she describes is painful.

But it makes grandly self-indulgent reading. This is a book that could only come from a privileged place. Allison Pearson and Kate Reddy have fantastic luck: Above all, they have the chance to complain extravagantly, leaving no lurch of the heart unmonitored. And they can choose not to work.

I Don’t Know How She Does It

It was only as a grateful member of the book's target audience that I was able to love every self-pitying minute of it. Pearson writes with instinctive comedy: Her writing is fun whether she is serious, trifling or merely describing the trifle constructed by an ambitious mother as 'the size of an inverted Albert Hall'.

At no point is this a dreary whinge from the kitchen Pearson's jokes have a manic, hyperbolic quality, laughter that might at any moment tip over into tears. My ideals told me that men and women could both go out to work and be truly equal. Their need for me was like the need for water or light: How does the novel underscore the ways in which the arrival of children irrevocably changes the relationship between husband and wife?

Does the novel suggest that Kate needs to let him reassume the primary economic role if their marriage is to survive? Does Pearson suggest that people are still offended by the idea of a woman who makes more money than her husband?

I Don’t Know How She Does It Reader’s Guide

One of the domestic Disappeared. Share on Facebook. Add to Cart. Introduction A fiercely ambitious and talented thirty-five-year-old hedge-fund manager at the London firm of Edwin Morgan Forster, Kate Reddy is a successful woman in a notoriously sexist business.

Her trouble is that her other life, as a married mother of two young children, is hopelessly at odds with her day job.

Kate Reddy is back and she's 50! Allison Pearson's sequel to I Don't Know How She Does It

She can do it all it seems —but the stress is ridiculous. But it makes grandly self-indulgent reading. This is a book that could only come from a privileged place. Allison Pearson and Kate Reddy have fantastic luck: a good job, full-time nannies, husbands who cook nice pasta dishes.

Above all, they have the chance to complain extravagantly, leaving no lurch of the heart unmonitored. And they can choose not to work. It was only as a grateful member of the book's target audience that I was able to love every self-pitying minute of it. Pearson writes with instinctive comedy: against the clock, with pressured panache.

Allison Pearson's 'I Don't Know How She Does It' gets a sequel

Her writing is fun whether she is serious, trifling or merely describing the trifle constructed by an ambitious mother as 'the size of an inverted Albert Hall'. At no point is this a dreary whinge from the kitchen Pearson's jokes have a manic, hyperbolic quality, laughter that might at any moment tip over into tears.

And she is a dab or dabbing hand at sentimentality. I found it strangely restful to read about frantic Kate, consoled by what I recognised and what I didn't. Pearson is unflinchingly accurate about relationships between mothers and nannies - controlled jealousy, suppressed criticism, qualified gratitude. She observes finely, too, the way working mothers are needily over-attentive to their children, compared to comfortably off-hand, permanent mothers, but mercilessly sends up 'Mother Superiors', whose children are their careers.

I am in sympathy with most of this.

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